1. notes

    3 years ago

    moshita:

anatomical treasure map


Yar! It’s the medical life for me. Where’s me rum…

    moshita:

    anatomical treasure map

    Yar! It’s the medical life for me. Where’s me rum…

    (Source: moshita, via fuckyeahcartography)

  2. 3 years ago

    House/Dog sitting till next Tuesday… These girls don’t need much entertaining!

    House/Dog sitting till next Tuesday… These girls don’t need much entertaining!

  3. 3 years ago

    Happy Birthday, lil pumpkin :)

    Happy Birthday, lil pumpkin :)

  4. notes

    3 years ago

  5. notes

    3 years ago

    Brewers Assoc Press Release: Total U.S. brewery count climbs to its highest level since 1900

    seaofstatic:

    Took long enough. Damn you, Prohibition.

    A canoli stuffed with canolis?? My. Dream.

  6. 3 years ago

    Every week I have a curriculum class that incorporates classroom learning with on-the-job learning. I also am assigned articles and such to read for class discussion. Usually the homework is on pathophysiological differences that premature babies experience and what we as nurses need to become aware about. This weeks homework and in class discussion was on the emotions the family feels during the birth and the aftermath of having a premature child.
This week we read an article about an Alsakan family who had a premature baby and did not know that the baby didn’t have any kidneys. The baby died very shortly after birth. This article went the through the feelings of the mother and the father and how it affected them. I found the article very interesting and heart-string-tugging but the follow-up questions to be answered surprised me. The questions were “How did the Mother react” and “How did the Father react” and the last question was, “How do we as nurses comfort the mother and father in their different reactions to stressful situations”. I answered the questions, but somewhere in the back of my mind a giant red exclamation point was bouncing around.
Tuesday was the curriculum class and we were talking about the article. YES, what I had thought was true. This portion of the class was talking about how we as nurses should keep in mind how men and women react different to stressful situations. We should not talk to the men because men don’t like to talk about their emotions, and let the women cry and talk because thats how women react to stressful situations.
OK… lets please graduate from the 1950’s form of thinking. Please.
I felt my hand slowly raise. “Alright, I agree with the fact that we should keep in mind that different people react differently, but I don’t agree with the stereotyping of genders.” Silence. “I think that each person, no matter what gender, will react differently and we should form our way of comforting that person based on their reactions and signals they show, rather than what gender they are. I recently took care of a very Greek family whose father does NOT fit the description you are talking about.” NODDING heads around the room who obviously had taken care of the same family. “That brings me to my next point, each culture reacts different as well and we should be culturally competent enough to know where our boundaries are.”  BOOM POW POW!! 
"Kayla brings up a very good and intuitive point…" says the course coordinator. (well duh. really? humans are still thinking this way?)
I just don’t understand that way of thinking. I don’t think its fair to anyone to expect a person to react a certain way to anything, let alone the passing of their baby. Everyone is their own person - no matter what genitalia - and we should not stereotype their way of coping. Or being.
Ill get off my soap box, but this was something that I have been thinking about all week. I am glad I raised my hand and spoke, I think I would feel even worse if I would have let it gown unsaid.
Cheers.

    Every week I have a curriculum class that incorporates classroom learning with on-the-job learning. I also am assigned articles and such to read for class discussion. Usually the homework is on pathophysiological differences that premature babies experience and what we as nurses need to become aware about. This weeks homework and in class discussion was on the emotions the family feels during the birth and the aftermath of having a premature child.

    This week we read an article about an Alsakan family who had a premature baby and did not know that the baby didn’t have any kidneys. The baby died very shortly after birth. This article went the through the feelings of the mother and the father and how it affected them. I found the article very interesting and heart-string-tugging but the follow-up questions to be answered surprised me. The questions were “How did the Mother react” and “How did the Father react” and the last question was, “How do we as nurses comfort the mother and father in their different reactions to stressful situations”. I answered the questions, but somewhere in the back of my mind a giant red exclamation point was bouncing around.

    Tuesday was the curriculum class and we were talking about the article. YES, what I had thought was true. This portion of the class was talking about how we as nurses should keep in mind how men and women react different to stressful situations. We should not talk to the men because men don’t like to talk about their emotions, and let the women cry and talk because thats how women react to stressful situations.

    OK… lets please graduate from the 1950’s form of thinking. Please.

    I felt my hand slowly raise. “Alright, I agree with the fact that we should keep in mind that different people react differently, but I don’t agree with the stereotyping of genders.” Silence. “I think that each person, no matter what gender, will react differently and we should form our way of comforting that person based on their reactions and signals they show, rather than what gender they are. I recently took care of a very Greek family whose father does NOT fit the description you are talking about.” NODDING heads around the room who obviously had taken care of the same family. “That brings me to my next point, each culture reacts different as well and we should be culturally competent enough to know where our boundaries are.”  BOOM POW POW!! 

    "Kayla brings up a very good and intuitive point…" says the course coordinator. (well duh. really? humans are still thinking this way?)

    I just don’t understand that way of thinking. I don’t think its fair to anyone to expect a person to react a certain way to anything, let alone the passing of their baby. Everyone is their own person - no matter what genitalia - and we should not stereotype their way of coping. Or being.

    Ill get off my soap box, but this was something that I have been thinking about all week. I am glad I raised my hand and spoke, I think I would feel even worse if I would have let it gown unsaid.

    Cheers.

  7. notes

    3 years ago

    It’s official. Well not completely, but pretty official.
Zach and I have decided that it is time to get our life started. No, there isn’t a ring on my finger, we are moving in together. The problem is that we both have amazing jobs we love about 1.5hr apart from one another. So how do we finally be together and start our life? Lake. Mills. Baby.
Lake Mills is a historic little town with tons of character. We looked at a Fargo home which is historically “the” wealthy and (I think) founding family of Lake Mills. The house was awesome, but way too small. We looked at another house about 50ft from the local high school and luckily it was a dump. Then we looked at a condo with a two car garage (can you say HOMEBREWING) and two full sized baths and bedrooms, gas fireplace, nice big kitchen and full sized laundry. Ramsey is welcome too!
Zach and I are not excited to move to Lake Mills. We are excited to be together. We have spent two years commuting between Milwaukee and Madison while we each finished our degrees and now that we landed our jobs we can make this work. We are definitely not “small town folk” but we look at this stage in our life as a stepping stone to bigger and better things. Such as mountains, tolerable snow and shiny cities with shiny lights!
On the upside, we are in walking distance of Tyranena Brewing and we can actually see all the hop vines from our place! We checked out the tap room and learned that its dog friendly, we also met the brewers own dogs too. The Glacial Drumlin Trail runs through Lake Mills so I will be able to satisfy my bike addiction and on the same note, a really great mountain bike trail for Zach is close too! There is a yoga studio downtown and really cute place with some good pizza. We also drove past a coffee shop that looked great too. Not to mention the lake, Ramsey will be able to go swimming so much more now!
So, a bittersweet moment in our lives that we will move on from and have stories to tell. I’m smelling a trip to Ikea, lots of great memories made and smiles- everyday - because Zach and I will be happy.
Cheers.

    It’s official. Well not completely, but pretty official.

    Zach and I have decided that it is time to get our life started. No, there isn’t a ring on my finger, we are moving in together. The problem is that we both have amazing jobs we love about 1.5hr apart from one another. So how do we finally be together and start our life? Lake. Mills. Baby.

    Lake Mills is a historic little town with tons of character. We looked at a Fargo home which is historically “the” wealthy and (I think) founding family of Lake Mills. The house was awesome, but way too small. We looked at another house about 50ft from the local high school and luckily it was a dump. Then we looked at a condo with a two car garage (can you say HOMEBREWING) and two full sized baths and bedrooms, gas fireplace, nice big kitchen and full sized laundry. Ramsey is welcome too!

    Zach and I are not excited to move to Lake Mills. We are excited to be together. We have spent two years commuting between Milwaukee and Madison while we each finished our degrees and now that we landed our jobs we can make this work. We are definitely not “small town folk” but we look at this stage in our life as a stepping stone to bigger and better things. Such as mountains, tolerable snow and shiny cities with shiny lights!

    On the upside, we are in walking distance of Tyranena Brewing and we can actually see all the hop vines from our place! We checked out the tap room and learned that its dog friendly, we also met the brewers own dogs too. The Glacial Drumlin Trail runs through Lake Mills so I will be able to satisfy my bike addiction and on the same note, a really great mountain bike trail for Zach is close too! There is a yoga studio downtown and really cute place with some good pizza. We also drove past a coffee shop that looked great too. Not to mention the lake, Ramsey will be able to go swimming so much more now!

    So, a bittersweet moment in our lives that we will move on from and have stories to tell. I’m smelling a trip to Ikea, lots of great memories made and smiles- everyday - because Zach and I will be happy.

    Cheers.

  8. 3 years ago

    Wisconsin "Budget Repair Bill" Protest Pt 2 from Matt Wisniewski on Vimeo.

    An idea of what life in Madison has been like. Beautiful.

  9. notes

    3 years ago

    "Obviously someone got their homework right here - this is more proof that smaller brewers can brew extremely flavorful, pale-colored beers. Kudos to Metro!"

    Conclusion to Beer Advocate’s Krankshaft review. (via seaofstatic)

  10. 3 years ago

    Sleigh Bells - Rill Rill

    One of my favorite bands with lead woman singer who I wish I was. This video is pretty rad.